Back pain in children and adolescents


Back pain is one of those issues that affect every demographic including younger and older generations. However, the older generation suffers greater consequences when it comes to lower back pain. Back pain in children and adolescents might be a different issue because they are still developing. So what to do about back pain in children and how to go about things. 

Is back pain in children and adolescents normal?

 

Back pain is just as common with children as it is with every other demographic. The reason for that is because while the young have a healthy strong back, they tend to do things that compromise their lower back move such as being rambunctious and playful. The older generations suffer back pain too but it is because of other issues such as bone problems, disc issues, and nerve damage that might happen with age. 

Back pain with adolescents is usually because of their activity. Most back pain at that age is due to being very active with other children and being more likely to engage in activity that puts their back at risk.  

What to do about it: 

The first step is to try and diagnose back pain. If the back pain is due to playful activity, there’s probably nothing to worry about as the back problems often fix themselves when they’re young. However, if the back pain is accompanied by other symptoms, then they probably need to be looked at by a professional. If the child or adolescent is experiencing these issues, then a visit to the doctor is due: 

  • Back pain that lasts more than two weeks
  • Inability to move certain limbs
  • High temperature 
  • Irregular bowel movement
  • Changes in appetite

If the back pain is due to being active, then it’s not a big deal. Children are known to have a fast recovery rate. However, you might want to use anti-inflammation medications that will help speed up the process of recovery as well as numb down some of the pain. In addition to that, you might also want to use some massages or a small introduction to the activity after a few days. Back pain is not an excuse to stay at home and avoid being active. In fact, being active is going to help speed up the recovery thanks to the blood flow. If blood flow is in the area, then more oxygen and nutrient will flow to that area helping its recovery. 

Conclusion: 

Back pain in children and adolescents is pretty common because they’re so active. However, they have a better and faster rate of recovery which means the most back is going to be safe. The best thing to do in this case is to rest for a few days following the injury and try to get as much activity as possible. More blood flow to the area is going to help with recovering any tissue that might have been damaged. However, if the back pain is accompanied by any unusual symptoms, then you might want to visit the ER. 


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